Projects currently in progress

Relationships Australia Queensland, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Queensland and Australian National University, are trialling a new group program that aims to increase social connections among older people living in the community.

Read more

Relationships Australia Queensland, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Queensland and Australian National University, are trialling a new group program that aims to increase social connections among older people living in the community.

This program, called Groups for Health and Wellbeing (G4H), is a 5-session program that runs over 2 months, and each session lasts for 1-2 hours. The focus of the program is to empower and assist participants to enhance their existing relationships and/or to build new meaningful connections. This research project is a pilot study focused on understanding the effectiveness of the G4H program for older adults, and so participants will be also invited to complete assessments both before and after the program, and a 3-month follow-up survey.

The group sessions will be delivered at these locations: Mackay, Sunshine Coast, Gold Coast and Chermside. The sessions will be run by RAQ staff. This program is open to both existing RAQ clients and people from the communities. It is free of cost for people who meet the eligibility criteria and are willing to complete the research surveys to give us feedback on the program. Reimbursements for travelling to/from the group sessions, and for completing the research surveys will be provided.

This program is suited to people who:

  • are aged 60+, or 50+ for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  • have some concerns about their social disconnections
  • have no major difficulties with their cognitive functioning or thinking abilities, or safety concerns

Because this program is mostly discussion-based, it is not suitable for people with major hearing impairments.

Please feel free to get in touch with Yuan Cao (who is the research officer managing this project) to find out more about this group program and research. Yuan welcomes enquiries either for yourself or for a family member, friend, or a client of yours. Please kindly note that she normally works on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, and her best contact hours are between 8:30am to 3:30pm. Her phone number is: 07 3423 6937. If you are unable to reach her on the phone, please kindly send her an email on ycao@raq.org.au and she will aim to respond to your email at the earliest.

Collapse

Aditi Lohan and Jelena Milic manage this national study which aims to measure the use and the outcomes of FDR in terms of reaching agreement in parenting and/or property disputes, maintaining positive arrangements over time, and the wellbeing of clients and their families.

Read more

Aditi Lohan and Jelena Milic manage this national study which aims to measure the use and the outcomes of FDR in terms of reaching agreement in parenting and/or property disputes, maintaining positive arrangements over time, and the wellbeing of clients and their families.

This information will be used to increase our understanding of client needs, and to improve our service.

This study was initiated by the RA National Research Network and is conducted in collaboration with RA Victoria.

This study is longitudinal in design, and asks questions of FDR clients about issues for resolution, adjustment to separation, client well-being, child adjustment, co-parenting conflict and child exposure to conflict. It employs a mixed-method design with quantitative survey data being collected at three time points:

  • at intake
  • 3 months post-intake 
  • 12 months post-intake.

Semi-structured qualitative interviews are conducted with a sample of ~50 participants each at 3 months and 12 months follow-up. Nationally, over 1,700 participants have been recruited to this study.

RA Queensland is taking the lead on examining parent and child mediation outcomes, while RA Victoria is taking a lead on investigating the outcomes of property mediation.

Data analysis and writing of the results is currently underway.

Collapse

Jelena Milic manages this study which aims to test the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) at the client’s first point of contact with the Gambling Help Service (GHS).

Read more

Jelena Milic manages this study which aims to test the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) at the client’s first point of contact with the Gambling Help Service (GHS).

This study is longitudinal in design, assessing the outcomes of the MI intervention on clients’ problem gambling, psychological distress, quality of life, and relationship, social and work functioning, alcohol and drug use, barriers to accessing the service and client satisfaction with the service. Participant data was collected at five time points:

  • at first call to the GHS
  • 1-2 weeks
  • 6-8 weeks
  • 6 months
  • 18 months after the client’s first call to the GHS.

Participant recruitment for this study was completed through the GHS and data collection for the final time point is now finalised. Data analysis and writing of the papers for publication is currently underway.

Collapse

Riyad Rahimullah is investigating barriers clients experience when using RAQ services, either as new clients or existing clients.

Read more

Riyad Rahimullah is investigating barriers clients experience when using RAQ services, either as new clients or existing clients.

A survey was administered to existing and potential clients (those who visited Relationship Australia’s website) examining several factors that potentially underlie clients’ engagement with the service and cessation of counselling.

These include problem severity, perception of stigma related to therapy, depression, anxiety, stress, mental illness, social support, various types of client motivation, client-therapist alliance, readiness for change and various types of barriers to treatment including personal stressors/obstacles and service-related barriers.

This research will assist in informing strategies to improve client retention and outcomes by addressing concurrent client-issues, which also warrants a practitioner’s attention and consideration when handling a client’s case.

Collapse

RAQ is an agency partner on this research study being led by Central Queensland University, the Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research and the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Read more

RAQ is an agency partner on this research study being led by Central Queensland University, the Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research and the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

The aim of this study is to understand the nature of the relationship between gambling and domestic violence. It is funded by Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety, and its findings will help to improve system responses to these issues.

The study's scope includes women’s experiences of DV linked to a male partner’s gambling, women’s experiences of DV linked to their own gambling, the role of gambling in a male partner’s financial abuse of women, the use of gambling venues as “safe spaces” for women experiencing DV, and experiences of male perpetrators of gambling-related DV against women.

The first phase of this study involved interviews with practitioners in DV, financial counselling, gambling help and other relevant allied services representatives (e.g. outreach, refuges) across Australia who have experience with clients of gambling-related DV and/or DV-related gambling. The second phase involved interviews with clients with lived experiences of gambling-related DV and/ or DV-related gambling.

Data collection for this study has now been completed. Data analysis and writing of the results is currently in progress.

Collapse

Riyad Rahimullah is currently working on the development and validation of a shortened version of Robert Emery’s 25-item Acrimony Scale.

Read more

Riyad Rahimullah is working on the development and validation of a shortened version of Robert Emery’s 25-item Acrimony Scale.

The Acrimony Scale measures conflict over visitation, child custody, child support, and conflict between separating parents.

Measuring acrimony is important as it predicts engagement and success of family dispute resolution sessions. It also predicts parental and child maladjustment.

A better understanding of the level of inter-parental acrimony may help mediators manage mediation sessions more effectively and also address adjustment concerns. The length of the current scale presents challenges in its use in routine service delivery settings. Hence, in an effort to minimise client burden and address challenges with the implementation, a shorter version of the Acrimony Scale is being developed.

Collapse